WFH

From my own little corner of the Work From Home (WFH) World — in between the laundry area and the hot-water heater, my own standing desk work space — a few thoughts to share. Or more like a list to share, actually.

1/ Make your work space comfortable, welcoming (to you), and quiet.

2/ Be sure you continue work habits you would typically follow in the office, to maintain continuity and productivity.

3/ Don’t let yourself get muddled down in the work (this applies to the office, too); take frequent breaks of a few minutes. It’s tougher to get your daily steps in at home, so make a point to walk around; the apartment, the house, the backyard, the block, whatever. My goal is 250 steps per hour. It’s been hit and miss so far, honestly, but I’m trying.

4/ Stay hydrated. I’m trying to maintain my usual consumption at work, about 16 fl. oz. every hour.

5/ Enjoy the variety, hunker down, and get it done.

#COVID19 #COVID-19 #coronavirus #halffullallgood #worklife

“Be Like the Irish, and…”

As some celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day today, a little different take to share.

For me, the obvious thoughts first go to the Irish People; weird maybe, but that’s what comes to mind initially.  I’ve got some Irish Blood in me, I suspect that’s why.

Then I think about the man himself, Patrick.  Who was he, exactly?

With these two ideas in mind, and given the current global public health crisis in Coronavirus and the COVID-19 illness it inflicts, considering a basic, pick-me-up on this particular St. Pat’s Day.

Fundamentally, it’s a common theme I keep coming back to:  PERSEVERANCE. 

A long while back in America’s history, before other ethnic groups were in the spot light as both key to our economy (as workers, etc.), and as parasite on “Natives” to the United States, the Irish people, the immigrants from this land, filled this hole.

And the Irish, like the Mexicans, and Guatemalans, and Hondurans,, and El Salvadorans, and Vietnamese, and Thai, and Indian, and Iraqi and Turks, and Palestinians, and so many others,

the Irish found a foot hold in America, established themselves for a future different than they might have had in their original homeland, and contributed much to our American culture and society.

And the Irish, like so many other peoples, have survived famine and war and violent political strife.

Let us apply the timeless human lessons that have propelled us forward, regardless of the difficulty.

God Bless the Irish, and all peoples that have taught us perseverance; those that have come to America looking to make a better life. In fact, expect for the peoples native to this continent, we are ALL immigrants.

That’s what comes to my mind…what comes to yours on this Saint Patrick’s Day?

More on Saint Patrick’s Day found here.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Patrick

More on Irish-Americans found here.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_Americans

More on America’s Immigration History found here.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_immigration_to_the_United_States

Charter Night: Celebrating Lionism

“Charter Night” is the annual gathering (usually an evening/dinner event) when and where a Lions club celebrates its founding and work.

I belong to a club in my community. Here’s a little something about my humble club, one of 46,000 in more than 200 countries around the world.

51 years.  FIFTY ONE YEARS. We’ve been around quite a while.


The Cupertino DeAnza Lions Club was established in 1969. 


Since that time and to this day, the primary focus of our club has been service. The primary draw of our club for new members has been service. The hook that keeps us all going is service.


And the bonus, the icing on the cake for all these years of service, what has it been?


It’s been the fellowship, the friendships that we have established and strengthened and enjoyed these many years; that fellowship has sustained us and energized us and resulted in service projects and charity work attending to those in need both near and far for decades.

These dual traits are the essence of Lionism:  Serving those in need, and enjoying fellowship along the way. 


As we celebrate and continue the work of the DeAnza Lions, let us keep these twin goals in mind, and also the wise words of our current International President, Dr. Jung-Yul Choi framed in the initiatives he defined this year.

President Choi’s programs and initiatives will focus on four key elements of Lions International that are essential to our mission of service.

  1. Strengthening membership through diversity
  2. Expanding service impact globally
  3. Supporting our global foundation, LCIF
  4. Empowering every Lion as a leader

Let us continue. Let us build on that motto established more than one hundred years ago when Lionism was first established:

WE SERVE.

Labor Day 2019

I think about Labor Day and a lot of different thoughts go through my mind.

What’s the origin of the holiday in this country?  “Beginning in the late 19th century, as the trade union and labor movements grew, trade unionists proposed that a day be set aside to celebrate labor, ” according to Wikipedia.

What, if any, is our U.S. Labor Day’s association with International Worker’s Day on May 1st?  Turns out that “May Day” is linked to an ancient traditional festival time in Europe, and similar labor movements in that region selected that date to also associate with honoring and further the cause of workers. That occurred around the same time in Europe that it did here in the U.S.

I think about the early 20th century novel, “The Jungle,” and the fictional account of very real working conditions in the meat packing industry in the northeastern U.S. around that same time period.

How far have we come with regulations and minimum wages in that time, to give rank and file workers safer conditions and enough income to live a reasonable life?  Lots of data, some objective results, but plenty of subjective opinion on those topics to be had, for sure.

Then I consider the hardest, most physically demanding jobs and who does that work.  Think about the people that work in extreme physical conditions, so that others might benefit from seasonal produce or the freshest catch.  How difficult is that work?  How much do those folks make?  Would I want to do that work?

I think about people I know that do white collar work and make good income; some are associated with organized labor, some are not.  I consider the various aspects of work today, and the manner in which plenty of white collar, high-skill workers also can be exploited and might benefit from organizing. 

Throughout the world we can say that collective bargaining has been good for workers in the industrialized world over the last one hundred and forty-odd years. We can also say that wages have increased, working conditions have improved, and society on the whole enjoys a higher standard of living along that same period of time.

Sure there’s still more work to do.   But I’ll spare you the red star or the fist clenched in the air.  We have to say that the owners and the governments and society in many countries have supported the workers’ cause, to everyone’s benefit.

In my humble view, Labor Day should be a day when we remember and appreciate all those workers, of all shapes and sizes and trades, all the rank and file whole make our economy churn.   Those that, through there hard work, make our country a better place to live.

We should appreciate, and honor labor, on Labor Day,  and everyday.

labor-day-750

More on:

Labor Day

May Day

The Jungle

AFL-CIO

Collective Bargaining